Shechet’s installation is a balancing act of respectful and radical.- Andrea K. Scott Read more

Shechet’s installation is a balancing act of respectful and radical.- Andrea K. Scott Read more

“…the dialogue it sparks between classicism and improvisation, nature and art, luxury goods and the processes of industrial production, brings these historic works vividly to life as never before.” - Leslie Camhi Read more

“…the dialogue it sparks between classicism and improvisation, nature and art, luxury goods and the processes of industrial production, brings these historic works vividly to life as never before.” - Leslie Camhi Read more

“a radical and rowdy rethinking of the precious” - Meghan Dailey Read More

“a radical and rowdy rethinking of the precious” - Meghan Dailey Read More

“Though these sculptures evoke the body through an elemental vocabulary, they also reveal the tremendous physical challenge of creation–most clearly evidenced when the work walks the tightrope between figurative complexity and palpable mastery. Shechet’s sculptures then realize a power of materiality.” - Brooke Kamin Rapaport  Read more

“Though these sculptures evoke the body through an elemental vocabulary, they also reveal the tremendous physical challenge of creation–most clearly evidenced when the work walks the tightrope between figurative complexity and palpable mastery. Shechet’s sculptures then realize a power of materiality.” - Brooke Kamin Rapaport  Read more

“The intelligence seems almost bacterial to me. Rather than simply incorporating the stand in the way of Brancusi, these works metaphorically and literally digest and ferment all of the things that they’ve stood on while being developed–including the trial and error, the accidents of their own histories, and the histories of pieces that came before them.” - Heather Kapplow Read More

“The intelligence seems almost bacterial to me. Rather than simply incorporating the stand in the way of Brancusi, these works metaphorically and literally digest and ferment all of the things that they’ve stood on while being developed–including the trial and error, the accidents of their own histories, and the histories of pieces that came before them.” - Heather Kapplow Read More

“Through recondite experimental processes, Shechet finds forms, colors, and textures for states of being that can approximate comedic collapse, gritted resistance, erotic exuberance, spiritual confusion, luxurious indolence, and private dismay. The approximations, mind you, are not in the work: they enter the equation only as we try to account for them.” - Sebastian Smee Read More

“Through recondite experimental processes, Shechet finds forms, colors, and textures for states of being that can approximate comedic collapse, gritted resistance, erotic exuberance, spiritual confusion, luxurious indolence, and private dismay. The approximations, mind you, are not in the work: they enter the equation only as we try to account for them.” - Sebastian Smee Read More

 



 

... like European Baroque and Rococo sculptors, she is drawn to spirals and vortices, imparting to her works an often wild drama. To experience her sculptures properly, one must walk around them more than once, for odd gravities and complex surfaces impart multiple identities. - Faye Hirsch Read More

... like European Baroque and Rococo sculptors, she is drawn to spirals and vortices, imparting to her works an often wild drama. To experience her sculptures properly, one must walk around them more than once, for odd gravities and complex surfaces impart multiple identities. - Faye Hirsch Read More

"Her lavishly asymmetrical, improvised forms – slumping this way, bulging that way – teem with references that are variously bodily, structural and cultural. They harbor unexpected apertures, tubelike appendages, Medusa-like mop tops and weird outcropping that may require complete, in-the-round exploration.” - Roberta Smith Read More  

"Her lavishly asymmetrical, improvised forms – slumping this way, bulging that way – teem with references that are variously bodily, structural and cultural. They harbor unexpected apertures, tubelike appendages, Medusa-like mop tops and weird outcropping that may require complete, in-the-round exploration.” - Roberta Smith Read More

 

"Brimming with knockabout energy, Arlene Shechet’s polymorphous clay sculptures...feel almost illegitimate in their sensuality and humor.” - Thomas Micchelli Read More

"Brimming with knockabout energy, Arlene Shechet’s polymorphous clay sculptures...feel almost illegitimate in their sensuality and humor.” - Thomas Micchelli Read More

Shechet turned a variety of gnarly, curling, enigmatic (and oddly sexy!) objects into a convincing language of sculptural form. - Jerry Saltz Read More

Shechet turned a variety of gnarly, curling, enigmatic (and oddly sexy!) objects into a convincing language of sculptural form. - Jerry Saltz Read More

“this is some of the most imaginative American sculpture of the past 20 years, and some of the most radically personal.” - Holland Cotter Read More

“this is some of the most imaginative American sculpture of the past 20 years, and some of the most radically personal.” - Holland Cotter Read More

“One feels there’s a complete embrace of the bodies of all things–humans, animals, vegetables, landscapes, architecture, and so on–which are drenched with your reconciliation of multiplicity, fragmentation, and change.” -Phong Bui Read More  


“One feels there’s a complete embrace of the bodies of all things–humans, animals, vegetables, landscapes, architecture, and so on–which are drenched with your reconciliation of multiplicity, fragmentation, and change.” -Phong Bui Read More
 

“Shechet frees the medium from its servitude to the decorative, allows it to be matter again, draws it back to the body, and puts it in play as a sculptural element.” - Anya Ventura

“Shechet frees the medium from its servitude to the decorative, allows it to be matter again, draws it back to the body, and puts it in play as a sculptural element.” - Anya Ventura

"indicative of a tendency toward paradox--a kind of conceptual friction and texture in itself--Shechet's sculptures simultaneously belie and embrace the pleasure of ideas” - Paul Ryan Read More

"indicative of a tendency toward paradox--a kind of conceptual friction and texture in itself--Shechet's sculptures simultaneously belie and embrace the pleasure of ideas” - Paul Ryan Read More

"an artist with energy and second-nature mastery to burn” Read More

"an artist with energy and second-nature mastery to burn” Read More

“I try to stay close to that, create the finished piece so it has the information of its making. Even though it will forever remain the same, I want it to have a whisper of where it came from .” - Arlene Shechet Read More  

“I try to stay close to that, create the finished piece so it has the information of its making. Even though it will forever remain the same, I want it to have a whisper of where it came from .” - Arlene Shechet Read More

 

“this collection of in-betweens, molds, errors, and false starts shows what normally goes unnoticed or gets discarded in the porcelain factory.”- Dawn Chan Read More

“this collection of in-betweens, molds, errors, and false starts shows what normally goes unnoticed or gets discarded in the porcelain factory.”- Dawn Chan Read More

“I like evidence of how the thing is made,” she continued. “I find that that actually makes something even more mysterious. To know more, strangely, adds mystery. I don’t even want to deconstruct that.” - Alex Greenberger Read More

“I like evidence of how the thing is made,” she continued. “I find that that actually makes something even more mysterious. To know more, strangely, adds mystery. I don’t even want to deconstruct that.” - Alex Greenberger Read More

She likes that there’s no easy way to describe her work, and that forms and impressions shift as you move around a sculpture. “By the time you get back to where you started, you see it differently,” she says. “I think that’s a metaphor—for everything.” - Hillary M Sheets

She likes that there’s no easy way to describe her work, and that forms and impressions shift as you move around a sculpture. “By the time you get back to where you started, you see it differently,” she says. “I think that’s a metaphor—for everything.” - Hillary M Sheets

“There’s wit and lightness in the original Meissen pieces, but also a dark side. I’d love for people to see them as new information.” - Arlene Shechet Read More

“There’s wit and lightness in the original Meissen pieces, but also a dark side. I’d love for people to see them as new information.” - Arlene Shechet Read More

"This unbridled show--grotesque, hilarious, lovely--makes the strongest case for the exaltation of clay since the recent Ken Price survey at the met” Read More

"This unbridled show--grotesque, hilarious, lovely--makes the strongest case for the exaltation of clay since the recent Ken Price survey at the met” Read More

“this collection of in-betweens, molds, errors, and false starts shows what normally goes unnoticed or gets discarded in the porcelain factory.” - Jurriaan Benschop 2013 Read More  

“this collection of in-betweens, molds, errors, and false starts shows what normally goes unnoticed or gets discarded in the porcelain factory.” - Jurriaan Benschop 2013 Read More
 

"Shechet's creations defy human nature in that they are not encumbered by the theoretical construction of beautiful forms; symmetry, harmony, balance-these pieces know no such conceptual restraints, existing as eternally open and revealed” - Kara Rooney Read More  

"Shechet's creations defy human nature in that they are not encumbered by the theoretical construction of beautiful forms; symmetry, harmony, balance-these pieces know no such conceptual restraints, existing as eternally open and revealed” - Kara Rooney Read More